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MS Program in Family Therapy, Iranian in Dubai

March 11, 2016


My childhood was enormously difficult in Iran, especially since we lived through the Islamic Revolution. Shortly afterwards, my parents divorced and the family was effectively dissolved. At 16, I immigrated alone to the United States. Now, a quarter of a century later, I am still on a quest to rebuild dreams that in a sense I was never permitted to have, discovering and accounting for my own child within through motherhood; now, I want to make a profession of that dream and give of myself to care for other families that suffer and are at risk. I have matured into a strong and reflective woman with heightened emotional sensitivity and a natural ability to connect with people. This is why I have chosen a career in family therapy; I want to empower families to strengthen their relationships and to build solid futures together that provide stable and loving homes for their children.

At 41, I have fulfilled my dream of raising a family of my own, with the wonderful children who have all of the opportunities that I did not have. I have a wonderful and vibrant community here in Dubai and I want very much to give something back to my society, from the bottom of my heart. Most importantly, Dubai needs family therapists, and I am extremely excited about the prospect of helping to respond to this need. There are virtually no social services to protect children and educate their parents about parental responsibilities; and this in a country that condones corporal punishment in both public and private spheres. As a family therapist in Dubai, I want to be part of a profound cultural transformation, something of an Arab Spring between men and women, for the benefit of children. 

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